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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tonight our focus is on what can be done so that the tragedy at sandy hook elementary school does not happen again. on friday december 14th a gunman killed 26 people, 20 of them were children between the ages of 6 and 7. it is the second deadliest mass shooting in american history. the killings have revived the debate on gun control and demonstrated the need to rethink our approach to mental illness. president obama traveled to the bereaved town to attend a community vigil and console families. here is a part of the president's address to the grieving people of that town, and to the nation. >> no single law, no set of laws can eliminate evil or prevent every senseless act of violence in our society but that can't an excuse for inaction. surely we did:do better than this. if there's even one step we can take to save another child or another parent or another town, from the grief that's visited tucson, aurora, and oak creek and newtown, and communities from columbine to blacksberg before that, then surely we have an obligation to try. >> rose: jo
in the previous year. one man knows a lot about that subject, new york city's deputy police commissioner, paul brown, who joins us live right now. mr. brown, congratulations. how have you done it? >> thank you, mainly through 35,000 men and women in uniform, but particularly through something called operation at attack where we send as many uniformed police officers as possible into areas where we have seen spikes and violence, particularly shootings. >> that sounds almost like a back to basics campaign. why was the decision taken to go in that direction? >> well, it started with mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly coming into the office right after 9/11 with a deep downturn in the economy, less tax revenue. we lost 6000 police officers through attrition, we have 6000 fewer now than we had then. that forced us to take a look at how we deploy officers into the city. instead of dividing them up as we usually did into 76 precincts, we focused better on defining exactly where the most violent crimes were happening and putting the biggest number of officers there, the biggest bang for the block.
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: let me start off. tell me what makes -- what makes a great restaurant? how do you -- >> well, what makes a great restaurant i don't know exactly. a great restaurant i think is where the owner and the chef gives all the love he can. >> rose: when does your day start? >> ooh, sometimes 8:00, sometimes 9:00, sometimes 7:00. >> rose: what's the first thing you do? >> oh, it changes a little bit. i stop at the office for 15 minutes and then i go down and look if everything is holding and look -- >> rose: see i had this impression of all of you at the fish market at 4:00 a.m. everyday saying "these are the finest and the freshest" and you're poring over the fish, picking them up and deciding "only this is good enough for my customers, my clientele." >> oh, of course, we are a very aware and we do buy the best and i think what makes a great rest vaunt the cooking also. of course the service, the ambience, and for that we buy the best, we don't wake up at 4:00 in the morning because we finished at midnight every night. but
's 300. a big part of that, in my judgment, what has been introduced in new york city, stop and frisk, where the police are allowed to go ahead, look at somebody who they consider suspicious, check and see whether the man has a gun, and that has really made a difference in terms of what's happened in new york. it's not the only thing but one of those factors. interestingly enough, 91% of the people would are shot are people from the minority communities. so they're the ones who are the most -- sadly to stay, one who get the worst of it, the brunt of it. so this is something that i think is absolutely critical in terms of getting gun control across the united states and diminishing the amount of murders. >> but tough same -- you had the same gun law, didn't you, when you had 2400 killed as 400 killed? >> no, we did not. >> you had a new gun law? >> stop and frisk -- >> i'm not talking about stop and frisk. i'm talking gun show -- >> hold on. >> the gun show loophole allows people to sell guns at gun shows without doing the background checks, and there have been no efforts, or no succes
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continues to lead the increasingly controversial austerity process. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate about whether the u.k. should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: british period dramas have long held a special fascination for american television audiences, upstairs, downstairs, pride and prejudice have been released to widespread attention and praise, downton abbey anybody the most successful and the latest, oscar-winning prize winner julian fellows already won six emmys and legions on fans on both sides of the pond. it is back on pbs in january and here is a teaser for the third season. >> from war and peace downton abbey still stands. >> no one must know. >> i am warning you. >> rose: joining me now, four of the stars, hugh bonneville, plays lord granderson familiar. >> elizabeth mcgovern. >> lady grantham. >> jim carter plays the butler and joanne greg plays anna, the head house made, i am proud to have all of you here. >> let me start and go around and tell me where you left your character and what to expect this year. >> the end of season 2. >> robert was relieved that the war and the spanish flu had deserted at long last and maybe he would get his home
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. it is estimated that one in five american veterans in these wars suffer from severe depression or post traumatic stress disorder. retired lieutenant colonel john o blin is one of them. he served four tours in iraq and surrounding persian gulf as well as three tours on the-- tours on the border of israel and egypt, awarded the bronze star, purple heart and kbrat action badge among other commendationses. he joins me tonight to talk about his life, also joining me an extraordinary group of scien titss, mary stein from california san diego, lisa shin from tufts university, kerry russler from emory university, joann difede from cornell and my cohost is dr. eric kandel. a noubl lawyer yet, professor at columbia university and a howard hughes medical investigator. i am pleased to have all of them here this evening at this table. which begin as we always do talking to eric kandel. what are we doing this evening. >> post traumatic stress disorder. this is a fascinating disorder. and it is unique in psychiatry. it is perhaps the only p
.c.'s mayor and city council. next major tax break, state and local taxes. deductible in full from taxable income. this costs the federal government about $47 billion a year, almost 5% of the annual deficit. so what's the objection to getting rid of the state and local tax deduction? >> the deductions for state and local taxes lowers the cost the citizens are paying those state and local taxes. it means those governments can charge higher tax than they otherwise would. take that away they'll have to lower their revenues at a time when they're in trouble themselves or it's going raise the cost to the citizens who won't be happy about it. >> reporter: as lawmakers rush to rescue the economy from the fiscal cliff emergency, they have focused -- as have we thus far -- on itemized deductions. but when it comes to tax breaks or preferences, says robert... >> not just deductions. it includes things like exclusion from income, the biggest one of which is the we don't tax you on the premiums your employer pays for the health insurance we get. much bigger than anything on the deduction side. it's no
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)